I’m back in Dubai after three days in London.

There’s no better place to begin investigating the benefits or otherwise of immigration than this amazing global capital.

Walk the streets and you hear every language under the sun – although I didn’t hear any Cockneys, and come to think of it, didn’t see the sun once! I think Londoners see themselves as Londoners before anything else. For example, they elected a Muslim mayor without any thought of prejudice.

London is also a great place to meet people with an opinion. Albert Einstein said: “If you are out to describe the truth, leave elegance to the tailor.” While it’s hard to disagree with the great man, I went in search of both with a visit to Tony Lutwyche. He’s a tailor to the stars – and dresses many of the world’s smart set. Tony’s a real enthusiast and reckons the world is getting smarter and closer, and that we all expect and benefit from improving technology and production skills.

I was then off to the Cavalry & Guards Club where Laura Kuenssberg, the BBC’s political editor, gave us the inside track on Trump, May and Brexit. You may recall Laura was the journalist who asked Trump about the immigration ban, prompting him to quip “There goes the special relationship.” She was frank, funny and a joy to listen to.

Her view is that the exponential pace of change in politics means that it is very hard to predict anything, and while the world is interconnected now in a way it hasn’t been before, it is also contradictory. On Theresa May’s comment that if you “think you are a citizen of the world, you’re really a citizen of nowhere,” she believes that Mrs May takes a suburban view of the world, that people want to have an identity, and that the international elite have taken everybody else for granted. In other words, she really believes what she says.

Across town at the Royal Thames Yacht Club – what is it with the Brits and their clubs? – I met up with Peter de Savary. As well as being a true gent, he’s a businessman, philanthropist, yachtsman and enthusiast. He’s been involved in the Caribbean for many years. He thinks that being a citizen of the world is a joy rather than an obligation or an obscure idea. “I like meeting people from other cultures,” he said. “It makes the world a more interesting place.”

Across town at the Royal Thames Yacht Club – what is it with the Brits and their clubs? – I met up with Peter de Savary. As well as being a true gent, he’s a businessman, philanthropist, yachtsman and enthusiast. He’s been involved in the Caribbean for many years. He thinks that being a citizen of the world is a joy rather than an obligation or an obscure idea. “I like meeting people from other cultures,” he said. “It makes the world a more interesting place.”

Professor Matthew Goodwin is a young academic, linked to both the University of Kent and Chatham House. His latest book is Revolt on the Right: Explaining Public Support for the Radical Right in Britain. He’s not only perceptive but backs up his positions with hard data. He reckons that people really don’t tend to be anti-immigration, rather they oppose immigration in certain circumstances – where it is poorly managed by government, for example, or where it generates obvious economic or social conflict.  Matthew is enormously good company and an important political thinker in this day and age.

I’m being followed around by Ben the filmmaker, who’s helping me bring my travels to life on social media.

Having a camera hovering around all the time gives you more respect for celebs. Such as Angelina Jolie.

She has just weighed in on the debate on refugees with an elegant op-ed in The New York Times. Not only is she beautiful, but she writes well and her heart is in the right place.

Americans have shed blood to defend the idea that human rights transcend culture, geography, ethnicity and religion,” she writes. “Targeting the weakest does not show strength.

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